Is being a ‘Peeping Tom’ illegal in Florida?

A former Volusia County, FL church pastor is accused of taking an upskirt picture of a member of the congregation in April and has been charged with video voyeurism on Thursday.

According to the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office, the 31-year-old man is facing a felony charge and was being held at the Volusia County Branch Jail before he posted a $2,500 bond Thursday afternoon.

On Sunday, April 8, 2018, a 41-year-old woman was attending services at the church, when she met with the man in his office along with his children after service.

According to officials, the man asked the woman to help put his youngest child in a car seat. She claims she felt the man touch her leg and turned around to see he was holding his cell phone and it had a red light on.

The woman and members of the church apparently confronted the pastor, who was removed from the church.

Video voyeurism is a serious crime with serious penalties. It is classified as a third-degree felony which is punishable up to 5 years in prison and a $5,000 fine. Video voyeurism, often referred to as “peeping tom” or “unwanted peepery,” is considered a sexually motivated crime. It refers to photographing or filming someone for their own sexual gratification, entertainment, amusement or profit or for the purpose of degrading or abusing the victim in a place where they had a reasonable expectation of privacy.

If you were charged with video voyeurism, our Florida Voyeurism Defense Attorneys at Whittel & Melton can help with your defense. Any allegation of a sexually motivated offense requires aggressive legal representation. We will fight to achieve the best possible results on your behalf.

For a free consultation, call us today at 866-608-5529 or contact us online.